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Sandy Grinnell, Staff Contributor
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NTSB Urges Florida to Pass Child Booster Seat Law

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When I posted the blog last week about National Child Passenger Safety Week, I didn’t know that the NTSB was going issue a press release today asking Florida to comply with its child booster seat recommendation. Florida is one of only three states that has yet to pass a law requiring older children to be restrained in a child booster seat. Arizona and South Dakota are the other two.

The NTSB has had the booster seat recommendation on its Most Wanted Listed of Transportation Safety Improvements since 1997. Here are their recommendations:

  • Use a booster seat when your child has outgrown the forward-facing seat. Be sure to check the height and weight limits for the seat you own. Your child needs to use a booster seat from about 4 to 8 years old or until your child reaches about 4 feet, 9 inches.
  1. Keep your child in a booster seat until the adult lap-and-shoulder belt fits properly. The seat belt should lie across the chest between the neck and arm and the lap belt must be across the upper thighs, not the soft stomach.
  2. An adult lap-and-shoulder belt can be used when your child is tall enough (usually about 4 feet, 9 inches) to sit against the back of the car’s seat with their legs bent at the knees with their feet hanging down.

The NTSB Chairman, Deborah A.P. Hersman says, This coming week the nation observes National Child Passenger Safety Week (September 12-18) with child safety seat checks and other events throughout the United States designed to educate and alert adults to the importance of keeping our littlest passengers safe." said Chairman Deborah A.P. Hersman. "Unfortunately, there are three states and two U.S. territories that still do not mandate booster seats for children." Hersman continued, "My colleagues and I hope that 2010 is the year that these legislatures will adopt this best practice and increase our young children’s safety in cars across this entire country."